New Mexico Digital Collections

About this collection

These interviews document oral traditions and recollections of Native Americans mostly in New Mexico and Arizona. Commonly called the Doris Duke Project, they were recorded, 1967-1972, by graduate students from the University of New Mexico. The bulk of the collection consists of interviews with Navajos and New Mexico Pueblo Indians talking about personal and family histories. It includes information on social culture, education, ceremonies, legends, language, government and history. Historical subjects reported from a Native American perspective include the Pueblo Revolt, brief tribal histories, traditional hunting practices and public works programs. Some interviews also contain commentaries on the 1968 Indian Civil Rights Act, the Red Power movement and the occupation of Alcatraz.

The American Indian Oral History Collection may be used for educational purposes only. More detailed descriptions of the interviews are available to the public via the Rocky Mountain Online Archive. The recorded interviews may not be copied. Access to the interviews is available only on-site at the University of New Mexico. Please contact the Center for Southwest Research for more information if you plan a visit to use the collection.

This digital project was funded by a grant from the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation and the generous support of Jim and Deborah Giannelli.

 
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